Forum Posts

Narell Hunt
Jan 19, 2022
In Authors Forum
Mother Earth is a story about a powerful being falling victim to her unfortunate circumstance. She felt unheard, unseen...forgotten. So, in return Earth began masking her pain with anger. Thousands of years go by, and none of the other solar beings want anything to do with her, because of how she treated them. Her closest friend and sister, Venus, was even driven away due to Earth's harsh ways. Humbling herself, she apologizes to her sister and the rest is history. Inspired by changing for the greater good. Mother Earth is the first story of novel "Just My Imagination." See what was keeping Earth down, and how she was able to free herself from misery.
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Narell Hunt
Jan 09, 2021
In Authors Forum
by Samuel O'Brient A space to write is just as important as writing tools for a writer. Everything around you affects how you think and therefore how you write. Inspiration can come from everywhere around us and is sometimes found in the most unexpected of places. It’s been said that writers should always have a room of their own, which is certainly true, but sometimes a room doesn’t have to be a room at all. Writers, such as myself, often find desks to be confining. Ernest Hemingway made constant references to the European cafes in which he wrote in his novel The Sun Also Rises. His friend and fellow author F. Scott Fitzgerald was known for this as well. As it turns out, there were plenty of other writers who felt the same way. The Elephant House “It’s no secret that the best place to write is in a cafe” J.K. Rowling once said. Rowling should know. The UK city of Edinburgh is home to The Elephant House, a gourmet tea and coffee shop. This charming little venue is known for being the “birthplace of Harry Potter,” and indeed, Rowling did do quite a bit of her work on Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone there before becoming famous. Since then, the venue has become something of a shrine to the Harry Potter series, displaying photos and other various artifacts from Rowling’s days there. Vesuvio Cafe Any fans of the Beat Generation will be familiar with San Francisco’s Vesuvio Cafe. A two-story cafe and bar, this venue opened it’s doors in 1948. In the years that followed, it would become a watering hole for Jack Kerouac, Alan Ginsberg, and plenty of other noteworthy beat generation figures. To make it even more convenient, it’s located just across the street from City Lights Bookstore, providing a great excuse to take a reading break from whatever you’re working on. Intelligentsia Coffee Novelists aren’t the only types of writers who love artsy coffee shops and cafes, though. Renowned screenwriter Scott Neustadter is known for frequenting Intelligentsia Coffee, a popular venue in beautiful Venice Beach, California. Neustadter is perhaps best known for writing the hit independent film 500 Days of Summer, which he wrote primarily at his favorite coffee shop. His work done there, though, also includes the adaptations of several John Green novels, including Paper Towns and the not-yet-released Looking for Alaska. Neustadter claims to have written the script for the film adaptation of The Fault in Our Stars at Intelligentsia in only three days. He loves the busy environment and claims to do his best work there. It seems that there are plenty of other screenwriters who feel the same way. Whether it be propped up on your bed, at a desk, or in your yard, share with us some of your favorite spots to write!
Famous writers' favorite spots content media
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Narell Hunt
Jan 09, 2021
In Authors Forum
Don’t be surprised if during your next office visit, your doctor hands you a prescription for a journal with instructions to write a minimum of 30 minutes a day! That’s right. Medical science has discovered what we writers have known for a long time…the benefits of journaling. According to research documented in the Journal of the American Medical Association, April 14, 1999, persons suffering from asthma and rheumatoid arthritis significantly reduce symptoms by “expressive writing.” Writing about (stressful) life events helps to put things into perspective. In the same way, journaling helps a writer to organize their feelings and thoughts and improves their perspective. Keeping a journal is also an excellent way for wanna-be writers to get into the habit of writing regularly. This not only improves writing and boosts confidence, but increases awareness and sparks creativity as well. First Step – The Journal Whether opting for a special hard cover journal or an inexpensive spiral notebook, seasoned writers utilize the benefits of documenting thoughts, feelings, solutions, and events – while fresh in the mind and creative juices are flowing at their very best. And as best selling author and syndicated columnist, Marjorie Holmes points, out in her book, Writing Articles from the Heart, “…ideas aren’t much use unless you write them down.” Some writers keep several journals; perhaps one for documenting events past and present, another for research notation, and yet another set aside as their “idea journal.” The Idea Journal In the idea journal, free flowing thoughts and ideas for creative articles, essays, devotionals, and other works are logged while still fresh in the mind. Besides documenting ideas that could birth their best piece yet, jotting down random thoughts and ideas helps to keep the writer’s mind uncluttered so they can better focus on the task at hand; writing. Perhaps something you read in the newspaper or saw on television sparked an idea worth exploring; maybe someone did or said something that caused you to remember a long forgotten humorous experience, or watching a mother robin feed her young from the kitchen window might have been your inspiration. Idea books are brainstorm books; catchall books later referred to when ready to begin a new piece or when the creative well runs dry and mental stimulation is needed. It can also be perused to jump-start new ideas from a single idea already written down in the journal. A wise writer will always keep a journal handy, whether at home, while battling the morning rush hour, or traveling abroad. Therefore, the type of journal selected is important. A small spiral notebook that can be conveniently tucked inside a purse or carried inconspicuously would be a good investment for times away from the house. A larger notebook or two kept in handy locations at home, say one in the bedroom and another in the living room, would also be helpful. Some writers prefer writing their ideas down on index cards kept in a file box. Others find that ideas jotted down on scraps of paper, then tucked inside folders and filed alphabetically or according to topic, best meet their needs. Find the method that works for you in keeping those gems of ideas handy and ready for use. Don’t rely on memory. Besides documenting personal thoughts, insights, and ideas useful for future pieces, maintaining a journal can help dispel confusion and keep you more focused. Share Your Journal Experience Have you ever journaled? Do you find it useful and if so how? Discuss below and tell us what you use to keep those creative juices flowing!
The joys of maintaining a journal content media
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Narell Hunt
Jan 09, 2021
In Authors Forum
We all have our go to inspirational talks that we go to on YouTube or Facebook when we need it. But who do you go to see when you are the one's that make the inspirational content? The answer is other authors. They are the people who weave the fabric of thought in our minds whether it be short stories, novels, or fantasies. Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. Who are some of the inspirational authors you go to in times of need? Share your thoughts with us below.
Must-see talks by inspirational authors content media
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